Rediscovering the Front Porch

Rediscovering the Front Porch

A guest recently said, ” the Bungalow’s front porch is the perfect cure all to all the digital screens we look at daily. How we’ve become used to the increasing hum and fans of electronics in our lives. We so enjoyed the renewal that came with this holiday home’s Front Porch along with the ease of a chat face to face with passing neighbors. Oh that Southern Hospitality! ”

The image of the front porch remains “as one of the few semi-public outdoor spaces associated with community and neighborliness,” says Victor Deupi of the Institute of Classical Architecture. Porches link us to an idealized past—one before e-mail (or even the telephone), when face-to-face interaction formed the core of communities. Then there are the practical considerations that have long kept the porch in favor: “Porches add beauty to a streetscape,” Depui says, “and they also offer environmental advantages by providing shade and breeze in the summer, and, if oriented south, allowing low winter light to enter the house.”

In contrast to many other American architectural traditions, however, the roots of our porches don’t appear to be found in Europe, but rather in the architectural heritage of colonial trading partners. Traders en route from the Caribbean to the British, French and Spanish colonies were influenced by island architecture, rich with large open porches to accommodate the humid climate.

Bungalows, were the last major historic architectural style in the United States to incorporate the porch. Frank Lloyd Wright’s homes made great use of porches, which reach out from under his signature cantilevered roofs. Wright, however, had a tendency to reorient the porch from the front of the house to the side or back, wishing to maintain the privacy desired by the modern family while also preserving his belief in the importance of a connection to the outdoors.

This Old House writes, “Soon, streets filled with Model T’s and the twin indoor delights of television and air-conditioning, and a middle class focused more on work than leisure conspired to dethrone the porch from its prominent place in American culture. But the underlying love for porches and their associations with the American identity never waned, and recent decades have seen a revival of porch-building. The classic image of a front porch filled with family and friends on a hot summer evening has long been a symbol of traditional American values, and it’s one that still holds true today.”

SUPER BOWL LV TAMPA

SUPER BOWL LV TAMPA 2021

Super Bowls in Tampa

Tampa has previously hosted four Super Bowls (1984, 1991. 2001, 2009). The last two played in Tampa took place at the Raymond James Stadium. We call it the Ray Jay here in Tampa!

The City of Tampa renovated Raymond James Stadium in 2016, adding new HD video boards and a sound system. Further improvements include suites, concessions and locker rooms. The current seating capacity is 65,000 but is expandable to 75,000 for a big game. 

Hosting any major sporting event in Tampa is a breeze, due to our excellent climate and popular local activities. Of course, Erehwon Retreat looks forward to showcasing our unique 1923 Arts and Craft Bungalow and Cottage experience. And choosing us gives you amazing  proximity to the stadium (just 4.6 miles away).

Super Bowl History

At Erehwon Retreat we have visitors from around the world, so I’m just going to explain a little about the Super Bowl to those who might not understand this great American institution. It’s the annual championship game of the American National Football League (NFL). Traditionally, from 2004 until 2020, it’s been held on the first Sunday in February. In 2020, due to COVID-19, it took place in September. What else can I say? It’s the second biggest food day in the USA after Thanksgiving. It’s also the most watched TV broadcast of the year – not just sports broadcasting – total TV! Finally, the Super Bowls in Tampa or elsewhere  are famous for half time adverts. This is the most expensive commercial airtime of the year, and companies create advertising just for the Super Bowl.

If the Tampa Bay Buccaneers (known as the Bucs) make it to the Super Bowl and win it will be a first. Sadly, the Vegas odds of a Bucs win are 60 to 1. Still, we’re crossing our fingers …